Question Typing Rates

JoCarole

New Member
A woman just called looking for a rate to type up some hand written notes to send to her attorney. She has half a steno book of notes, she writes big. This may require extra time to edit and maybe correct spelling. Would anyone be able to give me a standard rate for this? I have no idea what to charge? Thanks for any help with this, I appreciate it.
 

wpanddesign

New Member
I don't think there is a standard rate but I would charge an hourly rate. You could also charge per typed single or double-spaced page.
 

The Perfect Word

Community Leader
I would go with the hourly rate. I'm currently working on a big project typing from handwritten letters that are from the 1940s. And there are a lot of them! I'm charging by the hour. And there's really no way to give an estimate for this type of thing when there's a lot involved. I told the client that before we started working together and she definitely understood.
 

JoCarole

New Member
This woman that called wanted to know my charge, and I said I wasn't sure, either by the word or the page, but when she said 'handwritten notes' I was thinking, spelling, editing, etc. I didn't even mention hourly though. She wanted to come by and bring it over but I don't really like to have clients in the house, so I said I would go there, she can't scan it into her computer and she is very sick from mold in her house, or she would type it herself. That is what the letter is about to her attorney. I feel bad for her and trying to make it as simple as I can. Do you charge extra for double spacing, if they want that or editing also? Thanks Pam....
 
I agree with Stephanie. It would also depend on the size of the typing project, in this case would be a small project. I've turned down jobs because it would actually hurt the client than anything. For instance, someone asked me to type up a one page letter. Uh, 3.00 for the page or a flat fee? Hope this helps.
 

lisa4jvs

New Member
I know how many pages I can type in one hour as well as how long it would take me to edit those pages. I add my hourly rate, the dollar amount for editing time, and a cushion for unforeseen issues. That total is the foundation for my rate on the kind of project you mention. That being said, I'm in agreement with Pam on not giving an estimate when the size of the project is a concern.

As a sidebar, I'd DEFINITELY avoid a client bringing projects to your home. If they're allowed to do it once, they'll do it again. Set a boundary and maintain it.
 

VASbyBG

Member
This is helpful to me as I've been struggling (as a newbie) to figure out when to charge per line/minute versus hour/project when taking on typing jobs. Does anyone charge hourly for transcription or does everyone typically charge per line/minute? If the latter, how do you determine that rate?
 
I second VASbyBG's question as well as adding my own. How would one deal with a long distance client who wants you to type up handwritten documents, but can't scan them into the computer? Would you have to get a P.O. Box? That seems like a rather roundabout way to get a letter typed up. Has anyone ever transcribed from a photograph?

I was just about to ask how to go about setting rates for transcribing handwritten notes, I think I like the idea of charging by the hour the best. Does anyone charge extra for particularly bad handwriting?
 

The Perfect Word

Community Leader
Since I use my home address as my business address, I have no problem with a long-distance client mailing me handwritten documents. If the job isn't huge, they could be faxed to you, although faxed documents are not as clear as the original. If charging an hourly rate you will automatically get more money for difficult handwriting because it will take longer to do it than if the handwriting is clear.

I've typed from faxed documents, and I've had clients mail things to me (tapes, CDs, DVDs, and documents). I also have a local client that I get something from a few times a year that sends tapes to me by FedEx or UPS. (I will pick up locally within a certain distance from my house, but they are not that close.) I also require a minimum dollar amount for a first-time client because anything less than that isn't worth it for me.

Also, for transcription I offer clients two options for digital recordings: by the transcription hour or by the audio minute. Most choose by the transcription hour. I don't offer a per-line or per-page rate. I do have one client, though, that because of their client's requirements had to have a per page rate. I really wanted them, so I ended up agreeing to that. Turned out to be a very, very good client (one of my best), so sometimes breaking your own rules is a good idea!
 

ladydulcie

New Member
As a genealogist, I've transcribed alot of "photographic" pieces...not to mention microfiched documents from the 1700's when f's were s's. In 2012, I assisted in the transcription of the 1940 census. Talk about a challenge! But, once you get the hang of looking at different handwriting styles, you get used to it. But always...when in doubt....ask.
 

The Perfect Word

Community Leader
Kelly, that sounds fascinating! My son did a lot of that during his undergrad years when he interned at Poplar Forest (Thomas Jefferson's summer home)--census records, old letters and documents, etc. WAY back then the handwriting was so different, as well as the spelling of words, etc. Transcribing old documents is extremely interesting, but can really be a challenge, I agree!
 

Chanaiya

New Member
I'm new to VA however I'm trying to list my skills before hiring a subcontractor. I had no idea that typing up handwritten notes had a title.
 
I would just charge whatever your hourly rate. I have a service agreement for my clients and in that agreement it states that:
"ILLEGIBLE OR POOR QUALITY SOURCE MATERIALS are subject to an additional fee, paid to TVOS, based on quality of materials" and; "13.0 ERRORS, OMISSIONS AND DELIVERABLES. Final proof reading is the responsibility of Client. Client shall proof all materials prior to acceptance of the delivered work. All errors must be reported within twenty-four (24) hours of delivery, or work will be considered accepted. All errors reported within twenty-four (24) hours will be corrected at no additional charge. TVOS will not be held liable for delays in project completion resulting from Client or third party delays on agreed deliverables."

This way, she is responsible for her own proof-reading and you can just edit which will save you time. It would be better to let her correct her own words just in case she meant something else that you corrected.
 
Top